Immigrants in the German Vocational Training System: A Closer Look at Young People with Low Educational Credentials.

Immigrants in the German Vocational Training System: A Closer Look at Young People with Low Educational Credentials.

In: Michael Windzio (ed.). 2013. Integration and Inequality in Educational Institutions. Dordrecht: Springer

This paper draws a comparison between low educated young people with native and with immigrant background in Germany in terms of their chances to successfully enter vocational education and training (VET). Already analyses on a descriptive level point at differences between both groups. While the timing of transition processes of native-born young people strongly conform to the institutionally envisaged scenario, the transition patterns of immigrant youth do not resemble such a conformity. In addition, also differences between both groups exist with respect to the time period they need to make a transition into VET. Especially strong are the differences between native-born and immigrant males, as the transition for the latter group occurs with much more delay. The multivariate analyses show however that for the group of young people with low school-based education, gender differences, better grades at school, or having parents who have higher education are not characteristics that significantly impact the chances of making a transition into VET. Having left school at an older age than the average and being of immigrant background turn out to be characteristics of central importance that impact on accessing vocational education negatively. These analyses also reveal each of these characteristics exert an autonomous impact and may therefore indicate that a person who has a migratory background and is older than average competitors is potentially confronted with a combined disadvantage.

» Springer-Link URL